School

How the Cloud is Transforming Education

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School IT departments have generally been on the forefront when it comes to embracing new technologies, and teachers who also embrace the latest technologies can reap the benefits faster. The cloud has opened up their world, and technology is poised to finally deliver on its promise to transform education.

Assisting teachers

The cloud has reversed a disappointing trend for teachers. Previously, clunky hardware and failing technology meant wasted time and frustration – hindering rather than assisting them.

All that is changing as the cloud delivers a more flexible, responsive and less device-specific form of technology into the classroom, and the way information is stored, accessed, presented and managed is transformed. Coursework can be retrieved anytime, anywhere. But it’s more than just storage.

Education apps are becoming increasingly sophisticated in the tracking of individual student performance. In a context where there is a five or six-year difference between the most advanced and least-capable student in a classroom, distinguishing instruction is not only a worthy goal, but a practical necessity. And that's where cloud-based technology can help. Connected apps and services such as Mathletics and Duolingo allow students to work at their own pace and adjust the order and difficulty of tasks in line with their progress.

With such innovative data on students, teachers can make better informed decisions about the next steps in learning.

Improving student outcomes

Exercise books and textbooks are increasingly becoming relics. Cloud-based student learning management systems such as EdumateMoodleEdmodo and Blackboard are now staples in most schools across The United States and other countries. Their connectivity means students have access to the most up to date case studies instead of relying on textbooks, which quickly date and become unusable.

Cloud based applications like Microsoft Outlook and Google Docs allows students greater opportunities for collaboration, as documents can be edited simultaneously by multiple authors – including the teacher. This allows for more instant, targeted feedback.

Saving money

And perhaps the biggest impact the cloud can have on academics is the resolution of overstretched budgets. The security and maintenance of expensive infrastructure and internal servers are becoming redundant. Cloud-based storage services such as Amazon, Google and Office 365 provide huge amounts of space with the added benefit of the collective skill of world-class engineers to protect information.

Large upfront costs for software are also giving way to modest subscription fees for services that are continually improved and updated. And even better, many are free! The flexibility of these apps also means students no longer have to shell out big bucks for a laptop, with the ability to access many of the applications on their smartphones or tablets.

For initiative-fatigued teachers who are after a more convenient and efficient way to improve the teaching and learning cycle, a cloud solution from Current Technologies might just be the technological breakthrough they need to re-engage with technology.

We can make the Cloud work for you

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Making Tomorrow's Classroom Today

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Creating the Right Network Infrastructure for Tomorrow’s Digital Learners


Changes in how teachers use technology to reach students is causing network administrators to reconsider the way they think about network bandwidth, and these changes are speeding up hardware refresh cycles. Are you ready?

Two huge factors are driving these rapid changes in educational networking:

  1. The way that faculty members are using media to reach students
  2. The number of devices each student brings on campus

The changes will require network administrators to rethink their network bandwidth situation.

Teacher's and student's need for more network bandwidth is placing some institutions in a tricky spot, especially if wireless access points were just upgraded two or three years ago. However, the new upgrade is one that will meet school’s needs well into the future.

Video Drives the Network

Everyone wants their YouTube and cat videos. And in class, professors are not projecting video onto a central screen. They are giving students a URL to watch the video on their personal devices. The class is now responsible for 20 - 200 network streams instead of one.

That and students constantly checking for mail and social media updates mean a dramatic increase in the bandwidth required to each classroom, and to the campus as a whole.

New WiFi to the Rescue

The good news is that a new wireless networking standard, 802.11ac Wave 2 has now entered the field. 802.11n Wave 1, the highly successful predecessor to Wave 2, could provide bandwidth of more than 700 Mbps. Access points for 802.11ac Wave 2 can provide up to 7 gigabits per second of speed. It can also provide that high-speed access to some devices while providing lower speeds to older clients. The whole network does not slow down when old devices are present.

802.11ac Wave 2, which was certified by the WiFi Alliance and rolled out late 2016 solves many wireless issues but creates a need for a faster and more robust backbone. Current Technologies is partnered with Aruba Networks, Cisco Systems, and Aerohive Networks to customize a  wireless access system using the most up-to-date technology that delivers superb WiFi performance.

New Wireless Means new Wires

Most campuses have gigabit ethernet supplying their access points. Obviously, 7-gigabit access points need more than one gigabit Ethernet, so some campuses have begun dropping 10-gigabit lines to their APs. Also, these faster APs require Power Over Ethernet+, which may involve new injectors or Ethernet switches. These are not small costs because they involve changing physical infrastructure in existing structures.

Moving to 802.11ac is not like the move from 802.11a to 802.11n. The new move is a significant upgrade to the infrastructure.

We Can Help With The Transition

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We need to embrace technology to make learning more engaging. Because when students are engaged and interested, that is when learning takes place.
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