Mobility

Keys to Mobile Security

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Business mobility is sitting high up the priority list for CIOs in 2019. New research shows 64 percent of enterprises rank improving mobility and mobile security as a top priority. They see mobile access as key to improving employee talent, internal communication, making decisions faster and cutting costs. Mobility, however, comes with challenges. Top of that list is security.

Worries include:

  • Data leak prevention

  • Intrusion detection and prevention

  • Managing access to data

  • Preventing data loss when devices are lost

The concerns of IT leaders are easily justified. 82% of those surveyed said mobile devices can access most of their corporate data. As more enterprises introduce bring-your-own-device policies, more data will be put at risk.

88% of Android devices are vulnerable

University of Cambridge computer scientists recently found that the infrequent release and user reluctance of security updates for Android devices has left 88 percent of them vulnerable to at least one of 11 critical security flaws.

Apple is not in the clear either. The nature of iOS makes it hard for the same analysis to be done on iPhones and iPads, but the researchers said they expected the same level of vulnerability in the Apple ecosystem.

The sources of the danger

An employee downloads something infected with malware or connects to an unsecured WiFi network. The routes to compromise are many and easy to conceive. Once the malware is installed, it begins hunting for or capturing corporate data using the device’s access.

The greatest concern in these scenarios is the general lack of visibility that IT administrators have into potential mobile security issues. Most malware cases go unnoticed until it is too late.

Mitigating risk

Given that the growth in mobile usage is unstoppable (desirable, in fact), mitigation of risk is the only remaining approach.

A separate network for BYOD devices gives you a checkpoint to make sure personal devices and mobile apps are validated. A master security policy can set out exactly what information mobile devices can access. Secure mobile access solutions with context-aware authentication, network access controls and a virtual private network help keep access to only authorized users and mobile apps located on validated devices.

Also:

  1. If you develop and deploy your own enterprise apps, put them through a security vetting process

  2. Treat mobiles like laptops permanently connected to a network outside your control

  3. Know what applications your staff use to access your data

  4. Where possible, encrypt data at both ends of the transaction

  5. Protect data first and the device second. (Your mobile data management system should allow you to wipe a device remotely. Losing data on a server is a far bigger headache — loss of business, furious customers, lawsuits…)

We are here for your security needs!

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2018-19 School Year Technology Checklist

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Making your list for the year ahead


In the ongoing cycle of the educational year, it’s buying season for primary and secondary schools. That means schools and school districts are looking at the technology available for students, faculty, and staff. Then, they’re trying to make decisions that will affect those users for the next three to five years (or more). What are the products that school IT staff should be considering, given the march of technology and the lessons learned in the last few years? Let’s take a look at the issues and technologies for each of the constituents that school IT must consider.

Security

For faculty, the key considerations are security and the ability to work successfully with a wide variety of instructional media. The first of these considerations is obvious because FERPA requires it. Student data must be kept secure. The challenging piece of this is, of course, that the data must also be accessible to faculty and authorized staff at a moments notice.

Look for multi-factor authentication built into hardware and graphics capabilities that make it possible to run virtual desktops. These simply eliminate many of the security issues around sensitive data. When it comes to things like student data, it is wise to talk with professionals. Current Technologies has been working with schools for 20+ years and keeping their data secure.

Wi-Fi

The more technology gets integrated into schools, the more bandwidth schools are going to need. Streaming videos, internet searches and an array of learning applications all require bandwidth. With a slow connection, it could take half of a period just for students to load what they need.

The recently released 802.11ac Wave 2 is providing schools with more than 6Mbps, which is a huge upgrade from 802.11ac. With more students bringing their own devices from home and teachers continually integrating more technology, bandwidth has to grow. 802.11ac Wave 2 has done that and can last long into the future. 

Device mix

Student workstations are changing as school systems revisit desktop and laptop computers.

Tablets will remain relevant, although many schools have found that without comprehensive lesson plans and dedicated support infrastructure, tablets don’t necessarily provide the desired results.

While some schools allow students to bring family-owned tablets, school-provided desktop computers are more rugged, more easily secured, and more capable than tablets.

Mobility

Staff members are among the computer users who are focused on mobility for their systems. Part of this is due to requirements that administrators and specialists take systems home to complete work.

Another consideration is on-campus (or between-campus) mobility to supervise multiple locations or functions within the school. For these employees, convertible systems that combine laptop and tablet functionality are gaining popularity, especially with the addition of FERPA-compliant mobile device management (MDM) software to ensure security.

Networking, device mix, mobility, and security are the primary hardware considerations driving changes in education systems. For educational IT specialists, specifications for these three should be part of any requirements list for this year’s shopping season.

What's On Your Shopping List?

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