Helpful Hackers- They Do Exist

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Business IT systems are complicated, you know that. You've invested in security for your systems, but you're worried that there are still holes in your defense, weak spots between all the bits and pieces that make up your total networking and computing infrastructure. How can you feel confident in your security? You have to welcome a hacker into your midst.

It sounds counter-intuitive, welcoming a hacker (or team of hackers) to come and break into your network and your most sensitive data stores. But that's exactly what pen-testers (short for penetration testers) do—launch non-harmful, sophisticated attacks and probe to see if your network can handle the worst the world has to throw against it. Pen tests are almost always valuable, but to get the most from the exercise there are several things you can do.

1. Turn Them Loose

Too many pen tests are hampered because the client places significant limits on what the pen testers can do. One frequent example involves spear-phishing and social engineering. Will you let the pen testers send email messages to employees trying to tempt them into giving up network credentials or privileged information?

Some companies say they do not want to risk embarrassing employees, so they forego testing the human element of the network. If you do not run these tests, you lose valuable opportunities to see how well corporate training has been put to use by employees. The key is to not single out employees and treat any successful spear-phishing attacks as opportunities for education, not punishment.

2. Define Goals Before You Start

Is the purpose of the test to inform regulatory compliance efforts? Are you trying to see where weaknesses lie before starting a new security purchase cycle? Do you want to give your InfoSec team information before they begin revisions to the corporate security policy? Is this just part of your regular cycle of testing the effectiveness of your security?

Being clear about what you want to achieve from the test, and communicating that information clearly to the pen testing team, will help make sure the pen testers are working with you to be most effective.

3. Do Not Hire Them

Some executives resist pen testing because they worry that the results of the test could become subject to the discovery process in the event of a lawsuit. That is a legitimate concern, but there's a way around it.

Let your law firm hire them. If outside counsel hires them and delivers the report to you, then it is privileged communication and is immune from legal discovery. You get the results, everyone gets protection, and everyone (on your team) is happy.

“Hiring” a team of hackers can be the best thing you do to strengthen your network security. Do your homework on the firm you hire and follow the tips above, and you'll end up with a sound picture of where your security is doing its job—and where you should start immediately patching the holes. Our team at Current Technologies specializes in building state of the art security systems to your specification. If you already know where the holes are from a pen-test, it will be a breeze to have us patch them up for you.

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