Data Center Upgrade: Not All Or Nothing

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Everyone wants one screen to rule them all: one console display to monitor and manage all systems in a data center. According to some vendors, the only way to achieve this management “nirvana” is to bring in the forklifts and replace every system you own in one swoop. If you have an unlimited budget and no executive committee to report to, that's a suitable and realistic plan.

For the rest of us, the good news is that there is a better alternative: updating servers as they hit the end of their life cycle according to the refresh cycle. A mixed fleet of servers can be highly manageable if you consider a handful of key issues while you're building and evolving the servers within.

Picking The Server Management Framework

Several decisions follow the initial decision of which server management framework is selected. The basic split is between a framework from a hardware vendor and a framework independent of any hardware tie. While they are alike in many ways, there are key differences that will have major implications for your hardware choices.

Hardware-Tied Or Vendor-Neutral?

First, it seems obvious that a hardware-tied management framework should be at the top of your candidate list if all your servers are from a single vendor. While each new generation of servers has features that work more closely in concert with management applications, the vendor's software will typically work with at least three previous generations of hardware.

Vendor-neutral frameworks may lack the ability to take advantage of some specific server features, but they tend to offer consistent management across all servers of a particular generation and across two or three previous generations. They also can be cheaper depending on a multitude of factors. The real advantage of these frameworks involves existing analytics packages that you want to continue using. Integration with a wide range of third-party software is a strength of several vendor-neutral management systems.

Preparing For The Future

With all of these management frameworks, one of the most important considerations is how well the package prepares you for the future, since changing the software that manages a fleet of servers is not something to be taken lightly. Whether the management framework comes from a hardware vendor or not, it will be the tool that allows you to manage new servers and server blades as they are brought into service through the normal hardware refresh cycle.

As servers become part of a growing ecosystem of platforms that support virtual or software-defined functions, a management framework that supports all components of an integrated environment, from the server to storage to the network, becomes more important.

A single pane of glass that allows you to monitor and manage absolutely everything in the infrastructure is not yet available, but you can have a data center management system that will provide direct management of the servers in a diverse fleet while allowing integration with platforms that manage networking, storage, and other functions.

Another valid option for network monitoring and management is hiring a managed service provider (MSP). The advantages of hiring an experienced MSP like Current Technologies are numerous and include spending less on IT personnel, the MSPs are experts, you can rest easy knowing that someone else is protecting your network, and it is cheaper than and easier than doing it yourself.  It isn’t surprising that 70 percent of CIOs partnered with outside experts to plan manageable growth in 2018, find out what we can do for you today.

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How To Improve Your Network Without Major Investment

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Simple ways to Improve your Network Without Major Investment

Who knows how many more devices will be in the Christmas haul for students, staff, and faculty? You can certainly be sure most of those new devices will appear on campus at some point or another. However, you are not likely to find an unexpected budget for a major network overhaul in your stocking. But if there is something left in the budget, you might be able to make a big difference with some small improvements.

1. Take another look at what you are made of

When planning a network by looking at blueprints and floor plans, the basic question of building materials is easily overlooked. Those materials can make a big difference to the reach of a WiFi network, however.

Dense building materials like brick or rock could smother your wireless signal. Materials that hold water can also sabotage signal strength. Not taking into account a bathroom in the way can play havoc with signal strength.

If there are dead spots in your network, double check whether you have taken building materials properly into account. Buying a more advanced access point for a place where the signal is weak will not cost the earth. And it could give you a fast, reliable connection where you did not have one before.

2. Follow the crowd

WiFi users will mob in the places with the best signals. The problem is that those mobs then bring down the very network speeds they were chasing.

You might see real benefits in a small investment in access points in the locations where users would gather if only the WiFi were better. The right access point in the right place could give you double benefit:

  1. You have good WiFi where there were only complaints before

  2. You have even better WiFi where users used to congregate in greater numbers

3. Invest in Analytics

It might be time to invest in an analytics tool. If you already have good analytics tools, it might be time to fund a project to study the data. There are questions that you should know the answers to in order to make the most of your current WiFi:

  • Who is using your network

  • When they are using it

  • Where they are using it

  • What they are using it for

The answer to getting more from your network is not always going to be to buy more bandwidth, for instance. It might be a question of allocating what you already have better—perhaps spreading it further and more efficiently as with the suggestions here. It might also be a question of defining better rules for which data has priority.

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Connecting Branch Offices Made Easier

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Branch Offices Shouldn't Be Separate Worlds


Running a business across multiple locations has always had its share of IT challenges. Past approaches consisted of duplicating data between sites or relied on an often-unreliable wide-area network (WAN) links to make remote branches seem like part of the office network. With fast Internet connectivity now widespread, there are more ways than ever to securely connect staff at multiple offices

Extending corporate networks to remote sites has become far easier now that inter-office traffic can be routed across the internet without the need for expensive telecommunications links. With providers across the country improving their broadband services, it’s becoming easier than ever to link branch offices with rapid, secure, and reliable connectivity.

Keeping Your Data Safe

Data security, of course, is paramount when linking offices over the Internet. For this reason, you’ll need to encrypt your inter-office data by setting up a virtual private network (VPN) that creates a "tunnel" through the Internet between your work sites. Such tunnels have been widely and successfully used for years to link sites and to allow mobile users to log into corporate networks while they travel.

However, encrypting data is only one part of the challenge. With large numbers of branch offices in operation, you’ll need to develop and manage a coherent data architecture that controls where data goes, where it is stored, and how it is safely stored.

Previous store-and-forward models would see branch offices—particularly in time-sensitive retail operations—caching data at the remote site and periodically synchronizing it with central databases. Now that businesses are online and always available, data is more effectively transmitted in real time for storage in central transactional databases, which are often duplicated in a second, remote data center for redundancy and disaster recovery.

Cloud Solutions

Increasingly, smaller businesses are turning to cloud services to link up their branch offices in a different way. In this model, data is stored centrally in a cloud service and each branch office uses the same techniques to access it.

This approach lets businesses locate the data in whatever mission-critical data center is appropriate for the task while providing each branch office with the ability to access and collaborate on documents equally. This architecture also allows businesses to provide more consistent access to supporting services like unified communications, video delivery, identity management, security, and more, which are available to all employees at all branches.

With a cloud storage solution set up by Current Technologies, branch offices no longer need to be treated like remote outposts. By tapping into the flexibility and configuration of Internet-based services, it’s now possible to link even remote branch offices more seamlessly than ever before.

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9 Network Vulnerabilities You Should Address Now

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Finish the year on a secure note

Research from Spiceworks, a network of IT professionals, highlighted more than 70% of respondents rated security as their top concern for 2018. With the hacking epidemic on the rise, here are nine things involving hardware and software that can be done to help stop you from worrying about your business' security.

Hardware

Sure, software is the greater hacking risk, but many hardware vulnerabilities are software-based. Older equipment is often missing new built-in security features like:

  • Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) with Secure Boot

  • Self-healing basic input/output system (BIOS)

  • Pre-boot authentication (PBA)

  • Self-encrypting drives

That’s why you should be auditing and planning to remove:

  1. Computers with conventional BIOS- They can’t run Secure Boot, which helps to prevent malware loading during the boot process.

  2. Computers lacking pre-boot authentication or a trusted platform module (TPM), which stop the operating system from loading until the user enters authentication information, such as a password.

  3. Old routers, which can have easily hacked vulnerabilities.

  4. Drives that don't self-encrypt- Self-encrypting drives (SEDs) need a password (in addition to the OS login password), and the technology automatically encrypts and decrypts data on the drive.

On a side note, old drives leave you vulnerable in another way: you could lose data when they fail, which they will.

Software

Getting your hardware straight will almost always involve spending money, but fixing up software could be as simple as running those free updates you never got around to. Here’s what to look at:

  1. Unpatched or out-of-date operating systems- Windows XP has been beyond its support period for nearly three years but is still running all over the world despite there being no updates, no technical assistance, and limited efficacy with anti-virus. And old operating systems always have fewer security features than new ones.

  2. Unpatched or out-of-date productivity software- It’s highly risky to run unpatched versions of Microsoft Office, especially older versions like Office 2002, Office 2003, and Office 2007. They can give a hacker access to the rest of a system, with particularly catastrophic consequences if the user has administrative privileges.

  3. Legacy custom applications- If running an old version of Office is a risk, imagine the danger of running legacy custom software, particularly if you’re no longer doing business with the vendor (or the vendor is no longer in business). When your legacy software was being coded, the vendor probably wasn’t thinking of the sort of security attacks that are common today.

  4. Unpatched web browsers- No browser is entirely free of security vulnerabilities. Common vulnerabilities include URL spoofing, cross-site scripting, injection attacks, exploitable viruses, buffer overflow, ActiveX exploits, and many more. Always, always run the most recent version.

  5. Out-of-date plug-ins- Everybody loves a plug-in, but they have a high potential for disaster, especially if you’re not running the latest versions.

Outdated Hardware or Software Shouldn't Stop You

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Servers Designed For The Real World

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Extreme conditions call for extreme servers


When most people think about servers and the rooms in which they live, they think of serious air-conditioning, dust-less raised floors, and row after row of pleasantly blinking lights to let everyone know that all is well. Sometimes in the real world of IT, the world where the data and applications actually live, there are no clean floors or carefully controlled temperatures.

A new generation of servers designed for the real world is emerging. With some tweaks, you can make the most adverse conditions tolerable for your hardware. So how do you deploy servers in those situations and have the confidence that they’ll be reliable for months or years on end?

1. Room To Breathe

The first parameter to consider is temperature. It is remarkable how many servers manage to function in small, unventilated closets with no real airflow and an in-closet temperature that would be reasonable in a sauna. 

Modern blade servers tend to be designed around convection cooling as well as fan-enhanced forced air. If you know that a server will be deployed in extreme conditions, don’t stuff it full of processors or storage boards. Allow the air to flow unimpeded between the components. Modern servers are capable of keeping themselves cool as long as internally air is allowed to flow.

2. Rack Space

Give some thought to how components are stacked in the rack, as well. In many cases, storage is placed at the bottom of the rack because it’s heavy and the stability is good. In extreme conditions, it can be worth looking for secondary sources of stability — bolting the rack to the floor wall — while the heat-generating spinning disks are situated above the processor units.

With careful rack construction, physics can work in your favor with convection currents adding to the airflow and heat dissipation.

3. Stop The Spinning

Another consideration is whether it might be possible to eliminate spinning disk storage altogether and replace it with solid state drives. This is one of the tradeoffs that will involve thinking about:

  1. The data that will be generated and used on site

  2. The budget for the system

  3. Whether network connectivity is available to make cloud or central storage a realistic possibility

4. And The Rest

Other considerations will include networking, backup, and connectivity for any on-site instrumentation that will be part of the deployment. With everything that is connected to the system, look for jacketed connectors and ask your vendor about rack fan units that can keep air moving in the warmest situations.

One more thing: monitor the environment. There are a number of possibilities for environmental monitoring and reporting, possibilities that range from those that are standard in blade server frames to separate temp/humidity/vibration reporting units. Current Technologies has been designing hardware networking and storage racks for 20+ years. Our experienced and knowledgeable team can deliver you a set up that will survive any conditions long into the future

After designing the server and rack properly, then keep an eye on the conditions inside the rack. There’s no reason why your server can’t survive in the most demanding circumstances.

Functionality In Every Climate

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Why Smart Money Is Moving To The Cloud

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The benefits of owning equipment are thin when what you have bought will be outpaced within months by the next generation. The new equipment will be faster, more powerful, and cost less to run.

Outsourcing to cloud specialists means running services on better equipment at a lower cost. And not buying equipment means those costs shift from capital to operating expenses. All the expenses are deductible in a single tax year. No more carrying depreciation.

When enterprises make the decision to free up real estate, skilled staff and time by moving to the cloud, the first things they move tend to be email, accounting, software and backups.

Accounting

"An accounting file on a server or desktop is difficult to access by anyone who is not in front of the computer,” says Sholto Macpherson, editor of Digital First, a website dedicated to accounting technology. “Once it is in the cloud, a company can access it from anywhere and share it with external accountants, auditors, company directors and senior management."

That is why the cloud is where innovation is, Macpherson says. “Accounting software in the cloud can plug into many sources of data, such as e-commerce platforms, inventory and warehouse management, analytics and CRM software. Software developers are prioritizing online software, so the cloud then becomes the best source of innovation."

Email

Email is an area where vendors have significant cloud experience and supporting infrastructure. That makes it another good choice for a first move in transitioning to the cloud.

Cost savings are just one reason. When the US government’s CIO told agencies to identify at least three legacy systems to move to the cloud, many chose email. Their reasons included cost savings and also the potential to:

  • Provide more reliable services

  • Upgrade faster

  • Offer new collaboration capabilities

Software

Software as a service means lower initial costs. And there is no need to add hardware, software or bandwidth as the user base grows, because that is up to the software provider.

The software provider also manages all updates and upgrades, so there are no patches for customers to download or install.

Backup

Cloud backup avoids a common problem in backup infrastructure: a company adds storage in the primary environment but forgets to add additional capacity to match it in the backup environment. With cloud backup, you simply take as much as you need. As you add storage in the primary environment, your cloud service scales to match it.

You reduce your costs because you are not responsible for the infrastructure. And those costs can be predictable with fixed pricing.

The vendor might also offer additional benefits, like making replication between sites and keeping multiple copies.

Switching To The Cloud Is Easier Than You Think!

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IT Standardization Is Key For Any BYOD Policy

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It may have been inconceivable ten years ago, but it didn't take long for today’s workers to get used to bringing their own technology to work. Driven by claims that they can work more productively on their own devices, workers now take bring your own device (BYOD) policies for granted, even though they have created management and security headaches for IT administrators.

Businesses have long standardized their equipment to make it easier to swap in new PCs when old ones break or need to be upgraded. Yet the lack of control over laptops and other BYOD devices is challenging this practice, presenting issues for IT administrators and the integrity of business data.

Administrators often have no way of finding out, or improving, a device’s security profile. This leaves businesses exposed when a new software vulnerability is discovered since administrators have no way to patch or upgrade the software on users’ personal devices; studies regularly attribute most security breaches to unpatched vulnerabilities that had been fixed years ago but were never applied to users’ devices.

Standardize Your Apps

These problems create a compelling case for standardization—if not of the devices themselves, then of the applications that they are running. It’s not just about making system administrators’ lives easier, but by mandating a consistent set of applications, for example, it’s easier to help employees communicate smoothly and effectively regardless of where they go or what device they’re using.

Standardizing productivity applications ensures that documents can be easily shared and used, minimizing the need for costly and time-consuming manual entry of information. It also reduces the need for staff training and making it easier to move employees between locations. It also reduces the number of applications needing support. With the average business already running well over 100 different applications, any reduction in complexity can only be a good thing.

Consolidating your applications also offers considerable cost benefits: you’re likely to be able to spend less on licensing costs than you would when buying multiple applications, and because you’re buying an application for a large number of users you will have better bargaining power with your suppliers.

Consider Cloud Solutions

It’s worth noting the value of cloud-based productivity tools in meeting these goals. Although some users require sophisticated productivity tools for certain jobs, in most environments users could make do just as well with a cloud-based tool such as Microsoft Office 365 or Google Apps. These store data in a central place where all users can easily access, view, and change information from any device, at any time.

The BYOD cat may already be out of the bag, but by standardizing your IT applications and infrastructure, you can reduce costs while remaining competitive, and improve flexibility. By identifying the best opportunities for standardization, you’ll be able to reduce technology-management overheads and ensure that your users are more productive, more often.

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Six Easy Steps To Tune Up Your PC

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Computer Crash Avoidance

Does your PC crash all the time? Does it take what feels like hours just to load one program? You are probably thinking that it's time for a new computer, well that might be an unnecessary expense. Just like healthy eating and good personal hygiene, good computer hygiene is important. No matter what computer you’re using, there are a few things you should do regularly to ensure that everything is running as well as possible. These include:

  • Minimize Startup Tasks

Many programs install plug-ins that automatically load every time you turn on your computer, whether you need them to or not. Keep these unwanted hidden programs from slowing you down. In Windows 8 and 10, use the Task Manager by right-clicking on the Taskbar, clicking “More Details,” and switching to the Startup tab.

Bonus Tip: Pay close attention when installing downloaded software. Even many reputable programs will install extra items you may not be aware of that can slow your system down.

  • Remove Bloatware

Bloatware is any unnecessary and often obtrusive program that comes pre-loaded on many PCs, or software that gets added during the installation of legitimate software. These unwanted programs often increase boot time, waste memory, and clutter up your system tray, desktop, and context menus.
 
You can uninstall programs manually by opening your PC's Control Panel and clicking on "Programs," then "Programs and Features." And to keep from accumulating bloatware in the first place, check to make sure you're not loading unwanted programs as you install new software by reading through the installation dialogue boxes and unchecking any options to install additional programs that pop up.

  • Defragment (if you need to)

Because of the way file systems work, over time small chunks of disk space can be left stranded and unavailable for use, which means the computer needs to work harder than it should to find space to store new files. Regular defragmenting will pull together pieces of files stored all over the disk, leaving more large, contiguous blocks of empty space that will help your computer run faster. Especially be sure to defragment after you’ve deleted large numbers of files.

The more places your computer has to search to find files, the slower its performance. That makes defragmenting the hard drive an essential step in any tune-up of a PC with a traditional hard drive. In Windows 7 and earlier, defragment by using the included Disk Defragmenter tool. In Windows 8 and 10, use the program Optimize Drives. If you have one of the newer solid state drives (SSDs), however, you're in luck—they never need to be defragmented.

  • Look For Memory And CPU Hogs

If your computer is running slow, it may be due to software that’s hoarding more of your CPU and disk resources than it should. Open Windows Resource Monitor (click "Start" > type "Resource Monitor" > click on the result) and you’ll be able to identify which programs are using large chunks of CPU time. If they’re slowing you down too much, it’s worth uninstalling them and finding alternatives that are more efficient.

  • Update Your Operating System And Applications

It might seem counterintuitive, but newer versions of operating systems often run better on old hardware because they have been optimized to do so. If performance is an issue for you, update your operating system—and make sure you also update all of your applications, particularly security tools and Web browsers, to keep yourself safe online.

  • Upgrade Your System

When many users consider upgrading their computer to improve performance, their first thought is often to add more RAM. If you're currently using most or all of your RAM, then adding more will provide a noticeable boost. If, however, you're not regularly using all of your current memory, adding more may make little difference to your computer’s performance. Search for Resource Monitor in the Windows search box to find out how much of your system's resources you're currently using. However, even if you're not using all your current resources, switching from a traditional hard drive to an SSD can provide a significant speed boost.

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With The Cloud, Power Failure Isn't The End

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What Happens When the Lights Go Out?

As if building up the IT systems that support your business wasn’t hard enough, you also need to have a clear plan for restoring your services if you lose power or if a natural disaster strikes. Downtime can be measured in thousands or tens of thousands of dollars per hour, so any sort of outage can quickly become a major problem that you need to remedy as quickly as possible.

But how do you get your business back up and running if your data isn’t available?
In the past, doing this meant maintaining a "hot" backup data center, typically located many miles away or even in another state. That site would be set up exactly the same as your primary site, with identical configurations of expensive servers and storage systems to keep copies of all your data. In the event of a failure, the business would switch over to the backup site until normal services resumed.

This approach was so expensive and complex that many businesses simply couldn’t afford it. Thankfully, recent advances in cloud storage make it easy to continuously protect your servers without having to maintain your own secondary data center.

Drop It Into The Cloud

The trick is to use cloud-storage services, which you may already be familiar with thanks to services like Dropbox and Mimecast. These services automatically synchronize your local data in a secure part of a cloud provider’s systems. These systems are housed in a robust data center that is usually far away from your own business. Server protection tools like Lenovo’s Online Data Backup for ThinkServers do the same thing for a whole server worth of data—or more.

Once key corporate data and applications are set to automatically back up to the cloud, a power outage is no longer a problem, because you can access your data from anywhere you can get online. This means you can still access your core systems and data even if your office is flooded, has suffered fire damage, or has otherwise been compromised. Just set up your employees on laptops in a safe temporary site, and your business will be up and running in no time.

Power Without Interruption

Although cloud storage services will protect your data from outages, they’re not the only thing to consider when dealing with power outages. If you’re not already using an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) for key servers, it’s well worth acquiring one so that your systems can ride out short power outages and you can gracefully transfer data to cloud-hosted applications in the event of a longer interruption. Just be sure you get a UPS with enough battery capacity to keep your servers running for a while. That way you can also plug your broadband modem into the UPS and stay online even when the lights go off.

Protecting Your Data From The Unpredictable

New technologies can help you to build a coherent business continuity strategy that will keep your servers online—or at least keep your data accessible—even when nature strikes. Current Technologies has been keeping businesses afloat through power outages and natural disasters for 20+ years. Our team has the experience and knowledge to design a plan that will work for you, no matter what the future brings.

We Can Make The Cloud Work For You

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5 Reasons The Workstation Is Key To Manufacturing

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Modern manufacturing is as much about reducing manual processes and innovating with digital prototyping and 3D printing as it is using machines to make a physical product. Modern manufacturing operations now require a high degree of computing power. Desktop workstations are ideal for providing a high level of computing power with a visual interface for an engineer or operator.

Evolution of the Workstation

For many years, the engineering workstation was a device category in its own right. Distinct from regular home and business PCs, the workstation was designed and built for high-end computation and graphics applications. They also included:

  • 64-bit processors (when PCs were 32-bit)
  • Large amounts of enterprise-grade memory
  • Discrete graphics capability
  • Plenty of local storage

In addition to the high-end hardware, workstations were also characterized by their Unix operating systems in a world where most people used Windows. As PC technology matured, 64-bit CPUs became a standard. Fast forward to today where the modern workstation is functionally equivalent to a high-end desktop, but it is still very relevant to manufacturing industries and technology development.

Workstations for Modern Manufacturing

With workstations now readily available, CIOs must evaluate the use cases for workstations and how they can complement ubiquitous mobile computers. In manufacturing, the business case for workstations remains solid.

1. Performance

The processing power, memory, and storage of workstations are superior to portable computers, and this is important where the immediacy of operational parameters is crucial. Workstations can also be "clustered" to deliver far greater performance than regular PCs.

2. Design and Visualization

The high-end graphics capability and large display options of workstations make them well suited to manufacturing where visual design and monitoring are central to operations.

3. Prototyping

Manufacturing is moving from traditional physical prototyping to the new era of digital prototyping. Products are designed then "tested" in a simulated environment using the known properties of the materials. Using workstations for digital prototyping can significantly reduce production costs and the time to market.

4. Security

Workstations have the added advantage of being able to be locked down and located in control rooms away from sensitive manufacturing equipment. Many manufacturing operations restrict mobile devices on site for reasons of fire safety and interference protection.

5. Application Support

Mobile device platforms are catching up, but the platform support and user experience of workstations is a much more complete environment than what portables offer.

The engineering workstation is alive and well in manufacturing and continues to offer a strategic advantage over other computing options. It's up to CIOs and IT managers to put them to best use, including for innovative programs like visualization and prototyping. Current Technologies' partnership with Dell allows for us to quickly bring you high powered workstations allowing you to begin maximizing productivity. If you are not currently using desktops for activities like monitoring lines, prototyping, or design you are missing out on a huge opportunity for growth.

Discover How Desktop Workstations Can Help You

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